Auscultation

n.

  1. the action of listening to sounds from the heart, lungs, or other organs, typically with a stethoscope, as a part of medical diagnosis.

[Solaris  Stanisław Lem]

Bruit

1\ ˈbrüt \ archaic
a: NOISE, DIN
b: REPORT, RUMOR
2\ ˈbrü-​ē \ [French, literally, noise] : any of several generally abnormal sounds heard on auscultation
Also: collective noun for a group of barons
\ ˈbrüt \
bruited; bruiting; bruits
transitive verb
: REPORT, RUMOR usually used with aboutword of his imminent dismissal was bruited about

Bruit, also called vascular murmur, is the abnormal sound generated by turbulent flow of blood in an artery due to either an area of partial obstruction or a localized high rate of blood flow through an unobstructed artery.

Brumous

adjective

LITERARY
foggy and wintry.
[H is for Hawk — Helen Macdonald]

Calcareous

adj.

Containing or composed of calcium carbonate. Chalky.

[“Clarice Lispector,” from Coming to Writing and Other Essays — Hélène Cixous]

Calescent

adj.

  1. growing warm; increasing in heat.

[Brendan Adkins, in a review of Brown Sugar on Letterboxd]

Carom

n.

1. a cannon in billiards or pool

v. 

1. make a carom; strike and rebound

[The Absolute Book — Elizabeth Knox]

Caryatid

n. (Architecture)

  1. a stone carving of a draped female figure, used as a pillar to support the entablature of a Greek or Greek-style building.

[Moby-Dick; or, The Whale — Herman Melville]

Casuistry

n.

  1. Specious or excessively subtle reasoning intended to rationalize or mislead.
  2. The determination of right and wrong in questions of conduct or conscience by analyzing cases that illustrate general ethical rules.

[A Reader on Reading — Alberto Manguel]

Catachresis

n.

  1. the use of a word in a way that is not correct, for example, the use of mitigate for militate. Also the name given to many different types of figures of speech in which a word or phrase is being applied in a way that significantly departs from conventional (or traditional) usage.